Entire Seventh Circuit Will Hear Making A Murderer’s Brendan Dassey Case

The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals has granted the State of Wisconsin’s request for an en banc hearing in the case of Brendan Dassey. That means the entire circuit of judges on the Seventh Circuit will hear the case.

Dassey and his uncle Steven Avery were convicted in the death of freelancer photographer Teresa Halbach. Their stories were made globally famous in the Netflix documentary “Making A Murderer.”

Previously, a panel of judges on the Seventh Circuit decided Dassey’s so-called “confession” was not voluntary and, thus, should not have been admissible at trial. Without the confession available as evidence, the state would struggle to re-try Dassey for the Halbach murder.

Three judges sat on the original panel. One disagreed and believed Dassey’s confession was voluntary and, thus, properly admitted at trial.

Now, the entire Seventh Circuit will hear the case. It is very rare for a circuit court to grant an en banc hearing. Oral argument will be heard on September 26th.

This is a breaking news story.  We will update it as details emerge.

Aaron Keller is an attorney licensed in two states. He holds a juris doctor degree from the University of New Hampshire School of Law and a broadcast journalism degree from Syracuse University. During law school, he completed legal residencies in the Office of the New Hampshire Attorney General and in a local prosecutor’s office. He was employed as a summer associate in the New Hampshire Department of Safety, which manages the state police, and further served as a summer law clerk for a New York trial judge. Before law school, Keller worked for television stations in New York and in the Midwest, mostly as an evening news anchor and investigative reporter. His original reporting on the Wisconsin murder of Teresa Halbach was years later featured in the Netflix film "Making A Murderer."

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